Category: Artist

AMAZING CITY PAINTINGS

Address: 564 W 25th St, New York, NY 10001
Video Link: https://youtu.be/W4HdG_ynBks
Artist: CATHERINE MACKEY
Exhibition Title: Taking Measure (Celebrating the City)
Exhibition Dates: Oct 5 -17, 2017
Gallery Link: http://stricoff.com/catherine-mackey/

Website: http://nycgalleryopenings.com
Subscribe: http://youtube.com/nycgalleryopenings

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WESTBETH GALLERY

Address: 55 Bethune St, New York, NY 10014
Video Link: https://youtu.be/k3yEtZY3vTs
Artists: Jehad Abu Hamda
Karly Anderson
David Armacost
James Bartolacci
Phoebe Berglund
Jeff Bergstrom
Caitlin Bermingham
Teo Blake
Richard Bloes
Marissa Bluestone
Ali Bono
Holly Brennan
Tom Burckhardt
Lydia Cardenas
Natalee Cayton
Jaqueline Cedar
Heather Cox
James Cullinane
Luis DeAndre
Sarah Dinkelacker
Sam Dollenmayer
John Donovan
Kasim Earl
Reid Farrington
Kyle Freeman
Jesse Gelaznik
Manuela Gonzalez
Sophie Grant
Dina Helal
Leslie Hodge
Chris Ketchie
Yon Mi Kim
Morgan King
Elizabeth Knowlton
Queena Ko
Pamela Koehler
Franky Kong
Tom Kotik
Christopher Lesnewski
Ali Lewis
Kelley Loftus
Rob Lomblad
Deborah Lutz
Doug Madill
David Miller
Lorryn Moore
Brancey Mora
Victor Moscoso
Anthony Naimoli
Vishal Narang
Shóna Neary
Katy Newton
William Norton
Natalie Ochoa
Rose O’Neill-Suspitsyna
Anibal Padrino
Laura Pfeffer
Jason Phillips
Eliza Proctor
Greg Reynolds
Kristin Roeder
Justin Romeo
Joshua Rosenblatt
Dyeemah Simmons
Mark Steigelman
Greg Stone
Paula Stuttman
Eric Vermilion
Butcher Walsh
Jenyu Wang
Nathaniel Whitfield
George Wisegarver
Alex Zak
Nicolette Zorn
Exhibition Title: Whitney Staff Art Show 2017
Exhibition Dates: Jun 23 – Jul 13, 2017
Gallery Link: http://westbeth.org/wordpress/whitney…

Website: http://nycgalleryopenings.com
Subscribe: http://youtube.com/nycgalleryopenings

Interview with All Def Poet Moody Black

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Interview with All Def Poet Moody Black

By Patrick Hill @Pathill17 @NeonRenMagazine

If you have not heard of Moody Black, you will soon enough. Rather you never heard of his poems or heard him speak; Moody is on a different level. Moody Black a South Carolina native, a visionary, an artist, an actor, a story teller, and photographer is art. To be feature on All Def Poetry giving the history of the platform from the days of Def Poetry Jam where Dave Chappelle, Kanye West, Common, Erykah Badu, Lauren Hill, David Banner, Alicia Keys, and more have grace their presence to the platform.  A platform where poets have come through and made a name for themselves. Moody Black performance itself has grace 2,167 views with 197 likes on All Def Poetry YouTube channel. The comments have been all but positive about “In the Field” performance.  His performance can be seen on Neon Renaissance Magazine video section and also on All Def Poetry YouTube Channel.

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So, I got a chance to chat with him over twitter to talk about his performances and issues of today. It was an honor and privilege to sit down with someone who will one day be highly recognize in conversations of great artist and poet. In the conversation, I had with Moody Black, I wanted to know a bit about him. Particularly what made him get involve with poetry. He said to me “my mom, she was a single parent. She would work during the day. Then, take college courses at night. She would bring her literature books home.” He continues “having to know Maya Angelou and Langston Hughes was a rite of passage.” He later explains what made him finally write poetry. “My mom had this book my father got her for their first anniversary (before the divorce) entitled “This Time Called Life” by Walter Rinder. It had poems about being young and free. That really pushed me to write.”  It was that point his desire for poetry grew.

 

I ask about his first time being on stage doing poetry and what that feeling was like when he got on stage. He explains “every time seem like the first time…I was and still is nervous…hoping I don’t mess up. Hoping people receive my art.” Being on stage is not easy as it may seem when you watch many poets go on and speak from what they wrote or memorize. However, you would not think that of Moody Black “In the Field” performance. A very compelling and powerful poem about a slave taking from home to the field. It was a very intense and well receive poem. I ask him about the poem. I wanted to know what was going through his head when he performed it. “Of course, the thing is not to show that you’re nervous you know the old saying never let them see you sweat” He said. He continues by saying “I always pretend that I’m there and I act as I’m that person in the poem.I put myself in that position.” I watched the video several times and each time it was just as good the first time I saw it. I also wanted to know from him was there a message that the character in his poem was trying to bring to light. “Definitely.  Being captured altered his purpose and changed the structure of his family. And being brought to a new land was confusing. However, he was determination to be free showed our resilience as humans” he said.  I also asked him about today’s society among African Americans in regards of his character in the poem and how it relates today. “Very much so.  African-Americans really don’t have an identity or connection to a culture. A feeling of loss and confusion” He explains. It was a very interesting point he made. Giving the climate of today’s society among African Americans is troubling especially with the unemployment rate, public schools, violence, and broken communities. There aren’t many black own businesses and programs to help produce more opportunities. Instead you have seen more incarcerations and police brutalities among African Americans. I ask him what is the remedy to repair that sense of loss and connection that African Americans struggle in this time. He basically said “education is the key, just gotta keep reaching and teaching.” I made a suggestion of the days of the Harlem Renaissance to reconnect the culture and identity which he agree would be great idea. Giving the circumstances, it would take more than just revamping the Harlem Renaissance to help unify African Americans. However, art has always unify African American communities culturally.

As we about to end our discussion, I ask some questions that relates to his style of poetry. His style of poetry has elements of hip hop in it. When you watch, and hear his “In the Field” performance, you will hear Trinidad James “Gold” style of rhyme within his performance. Who cannot forget that song. I had to ask him about today’s generation hip hop and what he listen to the most. “There’s a few I’m not really into. But Hip Hop, looked all music evolves. I embrace it. With the advancement of technology, I’m able to find the music I like. Right now, I still listen to Drake, Kendrick, Killer Mike, Brother Ali, phonte from little brother, and 2 Chainz.” He said.  He mentions his musical influences as well such as Run DMC, De La, ATCQ, Outkast, Jungle Brothers. Public Enemy, and Rakim. I also wanted his thoughts on the success of black films in 2016 and rather the bar was raised from those movies going into 2017. He wasn’t overly impress with the films but he was slightly impress as he said “nothing wow-ed me yet.” He later said “the films were cool. I would like to see more biopics from black writers and directors.Not sure if any bars were raised, though.” Even though the bars were not raised from his point of view for 2017, one can only hope what would 2017 will bring for black filmmakers.

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As Moody Black gets prepared to go on the road to continue his journey, his legacy will not be defined by one moment, but through many of his accomplishments. Gracing his presences on a platform such as All Def Poetry has not only spark the rise of many opportunities that may land his way. It has allowed him to reach audiences from all over to listen to his words and visualize his message that will spark the brain. Art is Moody Black. Mood Black is art. Even though that may confuse you, you have to think where would you be without art and what would you do without art. Moody Black innovation and vision of telling a story through a book or poem invites the mind to discover the world of Moody Black. As he prepares to go on the road, you may catch him at poetry nights in your community, or guest speak at your local events. His vision is to engage and inspire the minds in search of hope. Though I never mention in the conversation where we both share the same taste of music and the times of Right On! & Word Up! Magazine. I wanted you the reader to know about Moody Black and follow him throughout his journey. For he will be someone on a major platform that will encourage others to listen, love, and learn.

You can follow him on these social media sites

https://www.instagram.com/iammoodyblack/

https://twitter.com/iammoodyblack

You can also check out his website where you can purchase his cd’s, get the scoop on his next performance, or you can book him for your event.

http://www.iammoodyblack.com/

He will also be in North Carolina this Saturday for Pemansip: out the box. The link is below to order tickets to the event.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pemansip-out-the-box-tickets-33505287216?aff=es2

African American Art @ House of Art Gallery #Art

 

House of Art Gallery features artwork by some of today’s most gifted and talented contemporary artists of African descent. The visual literature that motivates, inspires and strenghtens at the same time. The art that tells our stories; that warms our spirits and moves our souls. It’s the art that allows us to reflect and reminisce. Featured in video are originals and limited editions by artists Leroy Campbell, April Harrison, Monique Luck, Maurice Evans, Justin Bua, Charly Palmer, Phyllis Stephens, Donald Black Jr and Annie Lee.

YouTube Channel:

Whitney Biennial 2017

 

 

In this year that started charged up with strong conflicting views and reactions, it should be an interesting time in American Art. For the seventy eight installment at the Whitney, the sixty-three artists and collectives presented thought provoking works in various medium to train their lens on race, economics and politics that is on a volatile cauldron – erupting like the constant lava flows of Hawaiian volcanoes. This is our America where questions and reactions level more to the surface. We are forced to confront, react and learn how what we see then process affects our deepest sensibilities to self then in relationship to our community. The climate is uncertain now in America but we have ART to be the defining force that galvanizes us together to reflect upon our humanity.

There are some highlights to this year’s survey as they are the most attention grabbing, works more on our curated view of contemporary art, and had a previous brush historically in ARTE FUSE. But we encourage all future visitors to the Whitney to see the breadth of works from this year’s Biennial.

Here is our quick snapshot of the Whitney Biennial 2017: Tommy Hartung we have seen him in a group show at On Stellar Rays. As always the arresting and biomorphic imagery is a slow burn standout. KAYA had a suspended raw installation that pulsated an urban vibe with a volatile current. Leigh Ledare produced witty images and her subjects colored it. Celeste Depuy Spencer added static verve to the everyday mundane like the youthful DJ browsing his decks. Jordan Wolfson with the swath of chains actually is a liberated nuance art piece. Matt Browning brought a simple minimalist story of the grid to the forefront which gives us a pause about boundaries we make or that need to be crossed. Raul de Nieves with the majesty of his sculpture amidst a stained glass background provided a reverent respite. Harold Mendez showed grace in his industrial material installation where its stark presence is a revelation.

As previously stated, all the works from the artists and collectives included in this year’s Biennial are to be seen and considered as one of the many notes that serenades the art viewer. We can only hope the symphony moves us to a better reflection of our uncertain times which we can hope for a better understanding then perhaps a positive pro-active resolution. Collectively that is our real power as Americans.

The 2017 Whitney Biennial
@ Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Ganseevort Street. NYC, NY 10014
On View: March 17 – June 11, 2017

 

YouTube Channel:

Arte Fuse

The controversial “Open Casket” painting

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Painter Dana Schutz image courtesy of Tom Powel Imaging. https://vimeo.com/tompowelimaging/8americansdanaschutz

The controversial “Open Casket” painting

By Patrick B. Hill @Pathill17

 

 

The Whitney Museum of American Art and artist Dana Schutz are under scrutiny for a painting called “Open Casket.”  The painting display a mutilated face of a young African American boy in an open casket. The artist acknowledge that the painting is of Emmett Till who was tortured and lynched by two white men in 1955. The story goes that Emmett Till was murder because a white woman accuse Till for whistling at her which made her uncomfortable. Her brother and husband tortured and lynched Till.  Emmett Till was so badly brutalize that his face was completely unrecognizable. A picture of Till face in an open casket can be seen on internet. The two men who did it was not charge for the death of Emmett Till. Not so long ago in late February, the white woman whom accuse Till for whistling at her admit that she lied. She falsely accuses Till of whistling at her. She is expected to drop a memoir of that event in the future.

 

Dana Schultz decided she wanted to do the painting of the mutilated face of Emmett Till to convey the universal horror of the murder and acknowledge the country’s lingering racism. The painting “Open Casket” draw a lot of attention at the 2017 biennial exhibition. The painting draw swift condemnation and protest from numerous artists and observers. In an interview with Artnet, Dana Schutz acknowledge that she knew the situation with her painting would be a problematic. She did the painting in response to the shootings of black men by police during the Summer of 2016. In her words, “The photograph of Emmett Till felt analogous to the time.” She continues “What was hidden was now revealed.”  (2017)

Whitney Museum will continue to display the painting at the exhibit. In their statement to back Schultz’s work:

 

“The 2017 Whitney Biennial brings to light many facets of the human experience, including conditions that are painful or difficult to confront such as violence, racism, and death. Many artists in the exhibition push in on these issues, seeking empathetic connections in an especially divisive time. Dana Schutz’s painting, Open Casket (2016), is an unsettling image that speaks to the long-standing violence that has been inflicted upon African Americans. For many African Americans in particular, this image has tremendous emotional resonance. By exhibiting the painting, we wanted to acknowledge the importance of this extremely consequential and solemn image in American and African American history and the history of race relations in this country. As curators of this exhibition we believe in providing a museum platform for artists to explore these critical issues.”(2017)

 

Dana Schutz acknowledge again that the painting’s subject matter is fraught. She said “I did not know if I could make this painting, ethically or emotionally.”  She continues, “I don’t know what it is like to be black in America. But I do know what it is like to be a mother. Emmett was Mamie Till’s only son. I thought about the possibility of painting it only after listening to interviews with her. In her sorrow and rage she want her son’s death not just to be her pain but America’s pain.”  (A white artist responds to the outcry over her controversial Emmett Till painting. 2017)

 

Do you agree with the artist on the stance or was she wrong? Let me know what you think  in this article.

 

Reference:

Gibson, C. (2017). A white artist responds to the outcry over her controversial Emmett Till painting. Retrieved from https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/arts-and-entertainment/wp/2017/03/23/dana-schutz-responds-to-outcry-over-her-controversial-emmett-till-painting/?utm_term=.bfd998e4d240

 

Boucher, B. (2017). Dana Schutz Responds to the Uproar Over Her Emmett Till Painting at the Whitney Biennial. Retrieved from https://news.artnet.com/art-world/dana-schutz-responds-to-the-uproar-over-her-emmett-till-painting-900674