National Endowment for the Art could be federally cut

National Endowment for the Art could be federally cut

By Patrick Hill

@Pathill17 @NeonRenMagazine

 

 

Little history about NEA, it was established by Congress in 1965. National Endowment for The Art is an independent federal agency that funds and supports art of America. NEA gives Americans the opportunity to participate in the arts, exercise their imaginations, and develop their creativity.  This is all from the NEA website. Through the partnership with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and philanthropic sector. NEA supports learning, affirms, and celebrates this country rich and diverse cultural heritage for which it extends its work to promote equal access to the arts in every community in this nation.

 

Why do you need to know this; the NEA has been important for those who share the same passion for arts. Whether you love to paint or dance. The importance of NEA carries weight to cultural art within our heritage background in the United States. It does not have to be just cultural but art in general. Think about all things that came from art in this country. We would not know of the Mona Lisa portrait. How about impressionist painters like Mary Cassatt? Historical figures in art.

 

Schools rely on art to open kids mind to the possibilities. Even times it benefits the student’s creativity and imagination wonders to a platform where they can show case it to the world. The NEA offers programs and grants to students and organizations who are into the arts. Now, it is about to be cut from the government budget. It will eliminate grants and programs from students to artists.

 

An article by Max B. O’Connell from Rapid City Journal called “Trump team considers elimination of National Endowment of the Arts.”  It suggests that Trump is considering eliminating NEA.

 

“According to a report in The Hill newspaper on Thursday, President Trump’s team has proposed the elimination of the NEA, as well as the elimination of the National Endowment of the Humanities and the privatization of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.” (2017)

 

He elaborates.

“Those potential changes are reportedly part of a blueprint to reduce federal spending by $10.5 trillion over 10 years, one that closely follows a plan put forth by the conservative think tank the Heritage Foundation last year.” (2017)

 

His reasoning.

“However, the NEA’s budget in 2016 was $148 million; the NEH’s budget was roughly the same, while the CPB’s budget was $445 million. Combined, their funds make up .02 percent of the estimated $3.9 trillion the federal government spent during the fiscal year, according to The Washington Post.” (2017)

 

 

So, what happens if the NEA is eliminate, Max B. O’Connell discusses that as well.

 

“If the NEA were to be eliminated, the reverberations would be felt by businesses beyond local arts organizations.” (2017)

 

“A study by America for the Arts showed that audience attendance at art events generates spin-off income for many local businesses, including restaurants, parking garages, hotels and retail stores, with the average arts attendee spending $24.60 per event (not including the price of admission).” (2017)

 

There is no word yet on the topic at this moment. It is clear now, it will be discussed sooner or later. That eventually the federal government will not put money into the NEA if President Trump see no importance into investing federal dollars into this agency. Potentially can lead to small businesses such as art organizations closing.

 

What do you think?

 

 

Painting in the feature is by Monet

 

Reference:

https://www.arts.gov/

http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/local/trump-team-considers-elimination-of-national-endowment-of-the-arts/article_85153e74-a717-5979-8c53-f430612b734d.htmlnea-lockup-c

 

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